Events & Exhibitions » Upcoming Events

    

Oblique Views Exhibition OPENING!

Lecture, Dancers, Booksigning, and Hands-on Activities

October 25, 2015 1:00 pm through 5:00 pm

Galisteo
The village of Galisteo, south of Santa Fe, was established sometime between 1790 and 1816. Prior to the Pueblo Revolt of 1680, perhaps as many as fifteen thousand people lived in a number of very large pueblos in the Galisteo Basin. When the Spanish returned in 1692, the Pueblo Indians left basin communities and joined other pueblos, mostly along the Rio Grande. Sustained colonial use of the basin, beyond the early missions at the pueblos, started in the late 1700s with livestock grazing and the establishment of a military outpost. By 1929 Galisteo Creek was being used to irrigate farmed fields, some of which were laid out in the Spanish fashion in long narrow strips. Two fenced cemeteries can be seen to the left, and the road encircles the church in the center of the photograph—a building that was probably also the center of the village. Photograph by Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, 1929.

Sunday, October 25 -- it’s the day to be on Museum Hill for the long-anticipated opening of Oblique Views: Archaeology, Photography and Time.

You’ll see historic images by Charles and Anne Lindbergh side by side with those of contemporary aerial photographer Adriel Heisey -- some of the changes in the landscape (Canyon de Chelly, Chaco Canyon, Galisteo) are profound, others are more subtle.

Photographer Adriel Heisey speaks at 1pm and again at 3pm. The Red Turtle Dancers of Pojoaque and Santa Clara Pueblos will display a butterfly dance, buffalo dance, and rain dance. Dance times are scheduled for 2pm and 4pm. 

Of course we’ll have the beautiful hardcover Oblique Views catalog available for purchase, with the contributers all present to sign.

A hands-on photography activity will be offered from 1 - 4pm.

Admission is free on Sundays for New Mexico residents.

See the full color postcard here!



Santa Fe
Even in 1929, Santa Fe was an art center, the state capital, and a historic community. It was still a town rather than a city, however, and agricultural fields can be seen not far from the Plaza (approximately at the center of the photo), the heart of the social and economic life of the town. The old capitol building can be seen surrounded by trees in the upper center. Trees also mark the Santa Fe River, which forms a wandering diagonal from lower left to upper right. North is to the right in this photograph. Photograph by Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, 1929.